Techno-Freek

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Location: Hyderabad, India

2/21/2005

AutoLink stir debate

A Google Inc. tool bar feature introduced this week is rekindling a debate over who should control what appears on a Web page—the site's creator or the software used to view it.

Google introduced a feature called AutoLink in a beta of its next tool bar version. AutoLink inserts links into Web pages where an address, package tracking number, publication ISBN (International Standard Book Number) or VIN (vehicle identification number) appears in the content. In the case of the address, the links connect by default to the recently unveiled Google Maps Service . The others take users to third-party sites.

While Google billed the feature as an easier way to gather related information, some Web publishers and technology analysts were quick to criticize AutoLink. They compared it to Microsoft Corp.'s Smart Tags technology that unraveled amid widespread criticism in 2001, saying AutoLink similarly changes Web content to the potential benefit of Google.

Google executives disagreed with the comparison to Smart Tags and said that Google's feature is substantially different because Web pages remain unchanged until a user initiates the insertion of links by selecting AutoLink.

"I understand where people are drawing the analogy, but there are a few key differences," said Marissa Mayer, Google's director of consumer Web products. "One concern from Smart Tags was that the pages presented to the user were implicitly changed from what publishers wanted to appear…Because we have this as a user-elected action, to get smart links to appear users have to click a button."

2/19/2005

IE is Worthless

You may or may not know, but there are other browsers out there than internet explorer, and you should use any one of them over it. there are many problems with IE, among them being non-standard rendering of html and css. this means that a web page could look the same in all other browsers, and be completely screwed in IE. unfortunately, IE is still the most widely used browser, mainly because it comes with windows, and most people don't even know any alternatives (besides netscape, which has had it's own problems but is now fairly superior to IE.)

Another glaring issue with IE is the fact that it continually has gaping security holes (which have garnered it the nickname INTERNET EXPLOITER) built in that allow access to your computer to viruses.

In the name of your own security, and in the name of proper rendering, research and choose a browser that is more compiant, safe, and, best of all, NOT contolled by microsoft. my browser of choice is mozilla's firefox.

More pages that show how meager IE really is:

I think the first time you'll get a Microsoft product that doesn't suck will be on the day they start producing vacuum cleaners.

2/17/2005

I am a google fan

Hi everybody. I am a big fan of google. So I changed my blog to look like it. How is the new appearance?

2/11/2005

Microprocessor Challenge to Intel

Setting up a battle for the future of computing, engineers from IBM, Sony and Toshiba unveiled details of a microprocessor they claim has the muscle of a supercomputer and can power everything from video game consoles to business computers.

Devices built with the processor, code-named Cell, will compete directly with the PC chips that have powered most of the world's personal computers for a quarter century. Cell's designers say their chip, built from the start with the burgeoning world of rich media and broadband networks in mind, can deliver 10 times the performance of today's PC processors.

It also will not carry the same technical baggage that has made most of today's computers compatible with older PCs. That architectural divergence will challenge the current dominant paradigm of computing that Microsoft Corp. and Intel Corp. have fostered.

The new microprocessor also is expected to be able to run multiple operating systems and programs at the same time while ensuring each has enough resources. In the home, that could allow for a device that's capable of handling a video game, television and general-purpose computer at once.

2/03/2005

Xp goes to 64 bits

The slow but inexorable march to 64-bit computing--the successor to familiar 32-bit x86-based technology, which has dominated the desktop world since the advent of Windows 95 almost a full decade ago--seems poised to speed up. Not only has Microsoft announced its plans to release its first 64-bit operating system for mainstream desktops, Windows XP Professional X64 Edition, by the middle of this year, but also the company has delivered its initial Release Candidate (RC1) of the operating system. Microsoft has produced 64-bit OSs before, most recently Windows XP 64-Bit Edition for high-end workstations powered by Intel's Itanium CPU, but XP X64 is the first Windows OS designed for PCs based on 64-bit CPUs that can also run today's 32-bit apps--most notably AMD's 64-bit Athlons, which have been on the market since 2003. Only with a 64-bit OS and applications can early adopters enjoy everything 64-bit computing has to offer, including access to up to 16 terabytes of RAM. (RC1 supports only 32GB of RAM--Microsoft says that the shipping OS will support 128GB--as well as 16 terabytes of virtual memory, but that's still vastly greater than the 4GB maximum of today's 32-bit systems.) For users, that translates into greater speed: 64-bit apps won't have to swap large data sets between memory and disk, and will therefore be able to load and process the data faster and more efficiently than 32-bit programs can. In use, XP X64 feels quite similar to 32-bit versions of Windows--with a few noteworthy exceptions. The Start menu, for example, has two renditions of Internet Explorer: a new 64-bit version and the same 32-bit version that Microsoft shipped in XP SP2. Why? Since 32-bit plug-ins for IE won't run in the 64-bit version, Microsoft had to retain the 32-bit version for people who want to keep using legacy IE add-ons, such as QuickTime or Google Toolbar. Because many 32-bit applications continue to use 16-bit installers, they can't be installed on XP X64. Of course, the biggest benefits of 64-bit computing can be realized only when applications capable of taking advantage of its huge memory resources appear. Several companies have offered vague promises about developing native 64-bit programs, but concrete plans are rarely available. NewTek says it will port its Emmy Award-winning LightWave 3D graphics and visual effects package to X64 sometime this year. Epic Games has pledged to release a 64-bit version of its Unreal Tournament 2004, but this has not yet materialized. The crucial factor is mainstream application support from Microsoft, Adobe, and other top-tier vendors--and they're not talking on the record. Hardware device drivers are another problem. Today's 32-bit drivers won't install on XP X64; and even though RC1 includes a wide range of drivers for popular devices, the absence of third-party drivers will torment many users of the new OS. (Owners of 64-bit PCs can download RC1 from Microsoft's Web site.)

The others take users to third-party sites.

While Google billed the feature as an easier way to gather related information, some Web publishers and technology analysts were quick to criticize AutoLink. They compared it to Microsoft Corp.'s Smart Tags technology that unraveled amid widespread criticism in 2001, saying AutoLink similarly changes Web content to the potential benefit of Google.

Google executives disagreed with the comparison to Smart Tags and said that Google's feature is substantially different because Web pages remain unchanged until a user initiates the insertion of links by selecting AutoLink.

"I understand where people are drawing the analogy, but there are a few key differences," said Marissa Mayer, Google's director of consumer Web products. "One concern from Smart Tags was that the pages presented to the user were implicitly changed from what publishers wanted to appear…Because we have this as a user-elected action, to get smart links to appear users have to click a button."

|W|P|110892760811879866|W|P|AutoLink stir debate|W|P|gsphanikumar@gmail.com2/19/2005 11:33:00 PM|W|P|Phani|W|P|

You may or may not know, but there are other browsers out there than internet explorer, and you should use any one of them over it. there are many problems with IE, among them being non-standard rendering of html and css. this means that a web page could look the same in all other browsers, and be completely screwed in IE. unfortunately, IE is still the most widely used browser, mainly because it comes with windows, and most people don't even know any alternatives (besides netscape, which has had it's own problems but is now fairly superior to IE.)

Another glaring issue with IE is the fact that it continually has gaping security holes (which have garnered it the nickname INTERNET EXPLOITER) built in that allow access to your computer to viruses.

In the name of your own security, and in the name of proper rendering, research and choose a browser that is more compiant, safe, and, best of all, NOT contolled by microsoft. my browser of choice is mozilla's firefox.

More pages that show how meager IE really is:

I think the first time you'll get a Microsoft product that doesn't suck will be on the day they start producing vacuum cleaners.

|W|P|110883697216288515|W|P|IE is Worthless|W|P|gsphanikumar@gmail.com2/17/2005 12:22:00 AM|W|P|Phani|W|P|Hi everybody. I am a big fan of google. So I changed my blog to look like it. How is the new appearance?

|W|P|110858010381992664|W|P|I am a google fan|W|P|gsphanikumar@gmail.com2/17/2005 12:59:00 AM|W|P|Blogger Matt|W|P|this looks great. good work!2/17/2005 11:19:00 PM|W|P|Blogger M Cat|W|P|Excellent! Very creative.2/11/2005 04:22:00 PM|W|P|Phani|W|P|Setting up a battle for the future of computing, engineers from IBM, Sony and Toshiba unveiled details of a microprocessor they claim has the muscle of a supercomputer and can power everything from video game consoles to business computers.

Devices built with the processor, code-named Cell, will compete directly with the PC chips that have powered most of the world's personal computers for a quarter century. Cell's designers say their chip, built from the start with the burgeoning world of rich media and broadband networks in mind, can deliver 10 times the performance of today's PC processors.

It also will not carry the same technical baggage that has made most of today's computers compatible with older PCs. That architectural divergence will challenge the current dominant paradigm of computing that Microsoft Corp. and Intel Corp. have fostered.

The new microprocessor also is expected to be able to run multiple operating systems and programs at the same time while ensuring each has enough resources. In the home, that could allow for a device that's capable of handling a video game, television and general-purpose computer at once.

|W|P|110811941545069859|W|P|Microprocessor Challenge to Intel|W|P|gsphanikumar@gmail.com2/03/2005 10:30:00 PM|W|P|Phani|W|P| The slow but inexorable march to 64-bit computing--the successor to familiar 32-bit x86-based technology, which has dominated the desktop world since the advent of Windows 95 almost a full decade ago--seems poised to speed up. Not only has Microsoft announced its plans to release its first 64-bit operating system for mainstream desktops, Windows XP Professional X64 Edition, by the middle of this year, but also the company has delivered its initial Release Candidate (RC1) of the operating system. Microsoft has produced 64-bit OSs before, most recently Windows XP 64-Bit Edition for high-end workstations powered by Intel's Itanium CPU, but XP X64 is the first Windows OS designed for PCs based on 64-bit CPUs that can also run today's 32-bit apps--most notably AMD's 64-bit Athlons, which have been on the market since 2003. Only with a 64-bit OS and applications can early adopters enjoy everything 64-bit computing has to offer, including access to up to 16 terabytes of RAM. (RC1 supports only 32GB of RAM--Microsoft says that the shipping OS will support 128GB--as well as 16 terabytes of virtual memory, but that's still vastly greater than the 4GB maximum of today's 32-bit systems.) For users, that translates into greater speed: 64-bit apps won't have to swap large data sets between memory and disk, and will therefore be able to load and process the data faster and more efficiently than 32-bit programs can. In use, XP X64 feels quite similar to 32-bit versions of Windows--with a few noteworthy exceptions. The Start menu, for example, has two renditions of Internet Explorer: a new 64-bit version and the same 32-bit version that Microsoft shipped in XP SP2. Why? Since 32-bit plug-ins for IE won't run in the 64-bit version, Microsoft had to retain the 32-bit version for people who want to keep using legacy IE add-ons, such as QuickTime or Google Toolbar. Because many 32-bit applications continue to use 16-bit installers, they can't be installed on XP X64. Of course, the biggest benefits of 64-bit computing can be realized only when applications capable of taking advantage of its huge memory resources appear. Several companies have offered vague promises about developing native 64-bit programs, but concrete plans are rarely available. NewTek says it will port its Emmy Award-winning LightWave 3D graphics and visual effects package to X64 sometime this year. Epic Games has pledged to release a 64-bit version of its Unreal Tournament 2004, but this has not yet materialized. The crucial factor is mainstream application support from Microsoft, Adobe, and other top-tier vendors--and they're not talking on the record. Hardware device drivers are another problem. Today's 32-bit drivers won't install on XP X64; and even though RC1 includes a wide range of drivers for popular devices, the absence of third-party drivers will torment many users of the new OS. (Owners of 64-bit PCs can download RC1 from Microsoft's Web site.) |W|P|110745108777278713|W|P|Xp goes to 64 bits|W|P|gsphanikumar@gmail.com-->